Jim Thompson's House in Bangkok

Jim Thompson was an American businessman who helped revitalize the Thai silk industry in the 1950s and 1960s. A former U.S. military intelligence officer, Thompson mysteriously disappeared from Malaysia’s Cameron Highlands while going for a walk on Easter Sunday, March 26, 1967. Many hypotheses have been advanced to explain his disappearance. Theories range from his committing suicide to his being carried away by aborigines.

The Jim Thompson House is a museum in Bangkok. It is a complex of various old Thai structures that Jim Thompson collected in from all parts of Thailand in the 1950s and 60s. It is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Thailand.

As Thompson was building his silk company, he also became a major collector of Southeast Asian art, which at the time was not well known internationally. He built a large collection of Buddhist and secular art not only from Thailand but from Burma, Cambodia and Laos, frequently travelling to those countries on buying trips.

In 1958 he began what was to be the pinnacle of his architectural achievement, a new home to showcase his art collection. Formed from parts of six antique Thai houses, his home sits on a canal across from Bangkrua, where his weavers were then located. During the construction stage, he added his own touches to the buildings by positioning, for instance, a central staircase indoors rather than having it outside. Most of the 19th century houses were dismantled and moved from Ayutthaya, but the largest – a weaver’s house (now the living room) – came from Bangkuar.

It took Thompson almost a year to complete his mansion. Now a museum, the Jim Thompson House could be reached by public or private transport. Except for Sundays, it is open to the public from 9am to 4.30pm.

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6 COMMENTS

  1. In fact , these properties are belonged to Jim 's grandchild named Henry ,…but he live in the US and not interest this house and strange arts like this ,so he (Henry) gave this house and properties to Thailand,and now I don't know who is the owner od Jim thompson house and business .

  2. Please be aware that I have recently published a report on the jim Thompson disappearance case from a scientific search and rescue (SAR) point of view — this has never been done before. I was able to track down and interview members and leaders of the 1967 search, evaluate the quantity and quality of the search, and analyze the search strategy and tactics, using modern principles from the (US) National Association for SAR and the seminal book “Lost Person Behavior.”

    I was also able to eliminate about half of the possible causes cited in the press, impeach two and evaluate the other eye-witnesses who claimed to have seen Thompson after he left the LKP (last known point, the Moonlight Bungalow), evaluate the so-called “Bones of Jim Thompson,” and compile all the primary documents (CIA, FBI, US DoS, letters, wills, estate administrations, coroner’s reports, etc.) on the case. I was also able to lay out a road map to a possible (but not certain) future solution and clearance of the case.

    This report is available gratis on my website at: http://www.themosttraveled.com/new/new_land.html. It is the second document on the page.

    Good hunting!

    Lew Toulmin, Ph.D., F.R.G.S.
    Former Chair, Section on Emergency Management, American Society for Public Administration
    Co-founder, Missing Aircraft Search Team
    Travel/Adventure Editor and Columnist, The Montgomery Sentinel (of Maryland)
    Silver Spring, Maryland USA

  3. He died by falling into a hole with spikes at the bottom while walking through some dense undergrowth in the jungle. One day his skeleton may be found, but maybe not, as the hole is small at the top and so covered by bushes it may be lost forever. dirt and debris gradually fill in the hole, burying the skeleton. I know because i was him in my previous life, and i had a dream about how i died then.

  4. Jim Thompson was an American businessman who helped revitalize the Thai silk industry in the 1950s and 1960s. A former U.S. military intelligence officer, Thompson mysteriously disappeared from Malaysia's Cameron Highlands while going for a walk on Easter Sunday, March 26, 1967. Many hypotheses have been advanced to explain his disappearance. Theories range from his committing suicide to his being carried away by aborigines.

    The Jim Thompson House is a museum in Bangkok. It is a complex of various old Thai structures that Jim Thompson collected in from all parts of Thailand in the 1950s and 60s. It is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Thailand.

    As Thompson was building his silk company, he also became a major collector of Southeast Asian art, which at the time was not well known internationally. He built a large collection of Buddhist and secular art not only from Thailand but from Burma, Cambodia and Laos, frequently travelling to those countries on buying trips.

    In 1958 he began what was to be the pinnacle of his architectural achievement, a new home to showcase his art collection. Formed from parts of six antique Thai houses, his home sits on a canal across from Bangkrua, where his weavers were then located. During the construction stage, he added his own touches to the buildings by positioning, for instance, a central staircase indoors rather than having it outside. Most of the 19th century houses were dismantled and moved from Ayutthaya, but the largest – a weaver's house (now the living room) – came from Bangkuar.

    It took Thompson almost a year to complete his mansion. Now a museum, the Jim Thompson House could be reached by public or private transport. Except for Sundays, it is open to the public from 9am to 4.30pm.

    Jim Thompson's House in #Bangkok http://youtu.be/UwiW69j_SpA

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